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Participant experience

Nearly 5,000 drivers across Washington expressed interest in an opportunity to be one of 2,000 drivers participating in the year-long WA RUC Pilot Project. The participant pool represented the state’s geographic population distribution and reflected the diverse types of drivers in the state, including demographics such as race, income, age, and gender.

 

What we’ve heard from drivers

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Over 16 million miles reported and mock-charged at 2.4 cents per-mile

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3 surveys, 6 focus groups, and the project help desk actively gathered feedback

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Nearly 2,000 emails and phone calls received from test drivers (58%) and members of the public (42%) as of April 2019

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Top concerns and questions include:

  • Privacy and data collection
  • Compliance and administration costs
  • Fairness and equity
  • Travel between states
  • Operational viability

Who participated?

A detailed infographic describing the demographic information of participants in the pilot project

Click to enlarge

From No-Tech To High-Tech
HOW PARTICIPANTS REPORTED THEIR MILEAGE

MILEAGE PERMIT

MILEAGE PERMIT

1% Use

  • Pre-select a block of miles (1,000, 5,000, 10,000)
  • Report odometer either electronically or in person every three months
  • Obtain additional miles as needed to keep mileage permit valid

ODOMETER READING

ODOMETER READING

28% Use

  • Post-pay for miles reported quaterly
  • Report miles either electronically or in person

PLUG AND PLAY

PLUG-IN DEVICES

56% Use

(37% with GPS, 19% without GPS)

  • Automated mileage meter with GPS and non-GPS options
  • Plugs into OBD-II ports in vehicles 1996 or newer
  • GPS-enabled devices automatically deduct out-of-state miles

SMARTPHONE APP

MILEMAPPER TM SMARTPHONE APP

14% Use

  • Records miles using a smartphone
  • Works with all vehicles
  • Available only on iPhone iOS

REVIEW OF DRIVING DATA AND SHARING FEEDBACK

Participants could review their driving data via an online dashboard or smart phone app provided by their service provider. Service providers also sent participants monthly or quarterly invoices depending on which mileage reporting option they selected. Invoices shared insights about individual driving habits and compared what the driver would pay under the current gas tax versus under the RUC.

Throughout the test-driving phase of the pilot, participants had the opportunity to report any flaws or observations made while test-driving and reviewing their dashboard and invoices. Test drivers also participated in focus groups and surveys, sharing detailed feedback about topics like the convenience and user-friendliness of reporting options and invoices, the importance of principles such as privacy, simplicity, transparency, cost-effectiveness and equity, and satisfaction with customer service and the pilot itself.

Feedback shared by participants and the public will be analyzed as part of the results for the comprehensive report that will be shared with the Governor, Legislature, and USDOT in early 2020.

Screenshot of odometer reading page used to report mileage. Participants reported miles by submitting odometer photos via smartphone, tablet, or other mobile device.

Participants could report miles by submitting odometer photos using a smartphone, tablet, or other mobile device.